Society must change. It’s in our hands.

Grenfell Tower - photo credit: David WallaceI am writing this just a few days after the horrific tragedy of Grenfell Tower. At the time of writing the death toll stands at 78 but there is a fear amongst the local community (which happens to be my local community) that this will rise considerably.

Never has an event quite so starkly demonstrated the inequality between the ‘haves’ and the ‘have nots’ in UK society. Nor shamingly, the disdain and neglect shown by a rich Council for its poorest residents.

Just a few days after the North Kensington disaster, the Resolution Foundation issued a report that showed that the wealth gap in the UK is widening. 1% of adults own 14% of the nation’s assets (worth £11 trillion) while 15% own no assets at all or are in debt.

A normal reaction of decent people to this is a mix of despair and anger with to coin a dreadful term “the powers that be”. But there is often a feeling of helplessness. “What can I do about it?”

The Economy for the Common Good has a vision for a fairer society and a sustainable future for the generations to follow. But this is not just a pipe-dream. Since its inception just 5 years ago, ECG is now operating in 22 countries. Over 2,000 businesses have signed up. In Salzburg, Stuttgart and Seville – to name but a few, municipal governments are operating to ECG principles.

Now the ECG has arrived in the UK. Companies, NGOs, local government, educators and other workplaces can start to implement the ECG Matrix into their working practices.

The ECG movement believes in building a new and fairer society from the grass roots level. Grass roots level means every one of us. We can make a difference. If you care about the future of society get involved with us. We can help you to help others and help the places where we work to make the changes necessary for a better future for all, not just the few.

David Wallace, Director ECG UK

David Wallace

David Wallace

Director

David worked in senior marketing positions with major brands, Heinz and Sony. He led corporate turnarounds at Linguaphone, Betacom and Cornwell Parker and has advised international companies such as Nokia and Speedo at Group Board level.

He co-founded TNR Communications in 1999, which he sold to the UK’s leading News Agency (the Press Association) in 2008.
In recent years he has worked in executive or trustee roles at a number of charities and not-for-profit organisations including in the fields of:
•Disadvantaged young people
•Dementia
•Personal change and development
•Wildlife conservation

He now brings all this experience (and more) to mentoring SMEs, charities and not-for-profit companies. He is also helping to establish Economy for Common in the UK - a movement that genuinely puts people first in business and other organisations and aims for a fairer distribution of corporate profits amongst those responsible for delivering them.

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